Antique Dhokra Pen-Stand

$36.00

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Sold by: Handscart
SKU: CBC 010 Categories: , , ,

Product Description

Antique metal material dhokra pen-stand is one attractive design which must be added to your home décor. It is made up from pure brass metal material that offers a great quality to the product. It is designed by the creative craftsmen from the rural India. It is one amazing specimen of authentic Dhokra work.


Sizes: 9cm L x 9cm W x 10cm H.
Weight: 290 grms.

About Art- Dokra Crafts

Dokra (also called Dhokra) art is an ancient method of making metal artifacts by a wax-casting technique. An art that is 4000-5000 years old, its earliest known lost wax artefact is the dancing girl of Mohenjodaro. The name comes from the Dokra tribes, the metal-workers of Bastar, Chhattisgarh. Distant cousins of this tribe also extend from Jharkhand to West Bengal and Orissa. Today, Dokra art is admired all over the world for its primeval simplicity and enchanting folk motifs.

The process of making Dokra is fascinating and uses only natural raw materials. The basic mold is made with fine sand (mostly found next to the river banks) and clay. Goat and cow dung or husk is added to the principal material then layered with pure beeswax found in the jungle where the craftsmen reside. Wax threads are then prepared and wound around the clay mold until its entire surface is covered uniformly. After this, decorative aspects are added. The clay is then cooked over a furnace where the wax comes out from the drain ducts. The furnace is built above ground with bricks and natural fuel (charcoal, cow dung or coal). The wax burns in the furnace leaving a free channel for the metal to flow. Molten metal (mainly brass and bronze) is poured inside the mold. The molds are taken out after the metal has melted, and half-an-hour later, water is sprinkled to cool them. They are then broken and the cast figures are removed. The portions are retouched and are meticulously scoured at the river with clean sand to give the products a soft polished look. Normally, a simple figurine could take anywhere between over fifteen to thirty days to make.

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Every piece of Dokra art has a distinct identity. According to artisan Monica, the tribes originally used this art form to create idols of deities, but over a period of time, as spiritual erosion took place, they started making more secular forms used more as artefacts than objects of worship. His craft collective has a vast repertoire – gods and goddesses, tribal and animal figurines, vases, door handles, and photo-frames. Nandi (Lord Shiva’s Bull) is one of the fast-selling favorites.

Traditionally Dokra as an art form was learnt and handed down over generations through the family. A native of Bastar himself, artist Monica began his journey in Dokra by learning from local master artist Shobha Ram Sagar twenty years ago, and he has since worked extensively with various Dokra artists, won national awards and participated in several international exhibitions as well.  He is helping to revive the art by training both men and women of the families in Bastar while also constantly striving to come up with new products which have contemporary use and commercial viability. Belonging to a rare and unique breed of items and processes, the Dokra products are indeed a collectible.

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Among the various art and craft forms present in our country, one which is very close to my heart is the Dhokra art. It is a laborious and time consuming art form but the end result is every penny worth it!
Dokra art is a non-ferrous metal casting technique which is prevalent in our country from around 4000 years. This art uses the lost wax casting method to bring about unique and stunning metal décor pieces. This is a form of art describing the tribal way of living and the products are always in high demand in India and abroad due to its simplicity and the stunning manner in which the folk form comes to life.
‘Dhokra’ name is derived from the Dhokra Damar tribes. This form of art is famous from Jharkhand to SantiNiketan in West Bengal & Orissa.
There are two main processes of lost wax casting: solid casting and hollow casting. While the former is predominant in the south of India the latter is more common in Central and Eastern India. Solid casting does not use a clay core but instead a solid piece of wax to create the mould; hollow casting is the more traditional method and uses the clay core.

The first task in the lost wax hollow casting process consists of developing a clay core which is roughly the shape of the final cast image. Next, the clay core is covered by a layer of wax composed of pure bee’s wax, resin from the tree Damara orientalis, and nut oil. The wax is then shaped and carved in all its finer details of design and decorations. It is then covered with layers of clay, which takes the negative form of the wax on the inside, thus becoming a mould for the metal that will be poured inside it. Drain ducts are left for the wax, which melts away when the clay is cooked. The wax is then replaced by the molten metal, often using brass scrap as basic raw material. The liquid metal poured in hardens between the core and the inner surface of the mould. The metal fills the mould and takes the same shape as the wax. The outer layer of clay is then chipped off and the metal icon is polished and finished as desired.

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The process of Dhokra craft can be carried out in two ways.
Solid Casting
Hollow Casting

Solid Casting is predominant in the south of India, whereas hollow casting is more common in Central and Eastern India. Solid casting does not use a clay core but instead a solid piece of wax to create the mould; hollow casting is the more traditional method and uses the clay core.
The first task in the lost wax hollow casting process consists of developing a clay core which is roughly the shape of the final cast image. Next, the clay core is covered by a layer of wax composed of pure bee’s wax, resin from the tree Damara orientalis, and nut oil. The wax is then shaped and carved in all its finer details of design and decorations. It is then covered with layers of clay, which takes the negative form of the wax on the inside, thus becoming a mould for the metal that will be poured inside it. Drain ducts are left for the wax, which melts away when the clay is cooked. The wax is then replaced by the molten metal, often using brass scrap as basic raw material. The liquid metal poured in hardens between the core and the inner surface of the mould. The metal fills the mould and takes the same shape as the wax. The outer layer of clay is then chipped off and the metal icon is polished and finished as desired.